National Park Sites
in Alabama I have Visited

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Horseshoe Bend National Military Park

On 27 March 1814, Major General Andrew Jackson 's army of 3,300 men attacked Chief Menawa's 1,000 Red Stick Creek warriors fortified in a horseshoe shaped bend of the Tallapoosa River. Over 800 Red Sticks died that day. The battle ended the Creek War, resulted in a land session of 23,000,000 acres to the United Sates and created a national hero of Andrew Jackson.

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The National Park Service web page for the Horseshoe Bend National Military Park provides additional information.

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Little River Canyon National Preserve

Little River is unique because it flows for most of its length atop Lookout Mountain in northeast Alabama. Forested uplands, waterfalls, canyon rims and bluffs, pools, boulders, and sandstone cliffs offer settings for a variety of recreational activities. Natural resources and cultural heritage come together to tell the story of the Preserve, a special place in the Southern Appalachians.

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The National Park Service web page for the Little River Canyon National Preserve provides additional information.

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Russell Cave National Monument

Russell Cave is an archaeological site with one of the most complete records of prehistoric cultures in the Southeast. Thousands of years ago a portion of Russell Cave's entrance collapsed, creating a shelter that, for more than 10,000 years, was home to prehistoric peoples. Today it provides clues to the daily life ways of early North American inhabitants dating from 10,000 B.C. to 1650 A.D.

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The National Park Service web page for the Russell Cave National Monument provides additional information.

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Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site

Before the first African American military pilots became known as the "Red Tails" they wore yellow tails as they began their flight training in the Army's PT-17 Stearman bi-plane. Their flying adventure started at Moton Field, in Tuskegee, Alabama, where the Army Air Corps conducted a military "experiment" to see if Negroes could be trained to fly combat aircraft.

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The National Park Service web page for the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site provides additional information.

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Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site

In 1881, Booker T. Washington arrived in Alabama and started building Tuskegee Institute both in reputation and literally brick by brick. He recruited the best and the brightest to come and teach here including George Washington Carver who arrived in 1896. Carver's innovations in agriculture, especially with peanuts, expanded Tuskegee's standing throughout the country.

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The National Park Service web page for the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site provides additional information.



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